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Dog Food Toppers – Encourage your picky eater to chow down

Posted by Susan Bero on

Is your Greyhound a picky eater? Are you trying to encourage an under-the-weather dog or senior dog to eat more? There are lots of prepared dog food toppers and gravies on the market, but here are some more economical suggestions. These simple and healthy dog food topper ideas are nutrient packed and easy-peasy. Determine which ones your dog likes and he will enthusiastically await mealtimes.

Greyhound eating

  1. Salmon

Dogs love the taste of fish!  Adding fish to your dog’s diet can boost Omega 3 fatty acids, which can improve coat quality and reduce inflammation. Next time you are using canned salmon in a recipe, save the juice, skin and bones for your Greyhound.  Salmon is a good source of omega 3 fatty acids, which are responsible for keeping your dog’s coat healthy and shiny, as well as supporting your dog’s immune system. Or you can feed your dog leftover cooked salmon or add salmon oil to her food bowl.

  1. Sardines packed in water

Sardines are a great added protein and Omega 3 fatty acid source. One sardine is about 25 calories and is fine for a small dog. Larger dogs can have 2-3 sardines.  Fatty acids go rancid quickly so once the can is open, the sardines should be fed within a couple days.

  1. Cooked or finely chopped raw vegetables

Fresh fruits and vegetables are packed with phytonutrients and are a great source of fiber.  Use nonstarchy veggies so as not to add too many calories. They can be fed raw but are more easily absorbed if cooked, therefore more nutritious. They can also be added to the food to increase bulk but not calories. Avoid the onion family as these can be harmful to pets. The cruciferous veggies are terrific but can cause gas for some dogs if given in large amounts, same with corn. Dark leafy green are greyt and do not need to be cooked. Limit veggies to about 1/4th cup per 10 pounds per day, as most veggies have between 30-70 calories per cup. Of course, organic is ideal to decrease the overall pesticide load. 

  1. Fresh fruit

Berries are the best, which are bursting with antioxidants and other phytonutrients.  Other good options are sliced apples, bananas, watermelon and pears. No grapes or raisins as these can cause kidney failure in some pets. Again, organic is better if you can, and watch the calories.

  1. Yogurt

Yes, dogs can eat yogurt!  Plain yogurt is a natural source of probiotics that may aid your dog’s digestion.  If your dog isn't lactose intolerant, yogurt is a great treat and supplement to their diet. ... Only choose yogurts that are free of sweeteners and flavors; Added sugars are not healthy, and some artificial sweeteners, like xylitol, are toxic for dogs.  You should also look for yogurt that has lots of live cultures, such as plain, Greek-style yogurt. This yogurt is better because it has lower levels of lactose than regular yogurt.

  1. Eggs

Eggs are a high quality protein source for pups. They are healthy and when cooked, a bioavailable form of protein. Do not feed the shells as they do not have an ideal calcium phosphorous ratio for dogs. An egg has about 70 calories so factor this in when feeding. A daily egg is fine for a medium or large breed but small breeds should be limited to ½ an egg per day. 

 If you want to go another step further, you can make your own Dog Food Toppers.  MODERN DOG MAGAZINE has some fun recipes to try.  Find them here:

https://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/diy-eat-delicious-dog-food-toppers/124400

With any food additive it is advisable to introduce slowly and watch for any signs of digestive upset. Dogs are scavengers by nature and really should be able to tolerate all the items on this list but the fact is that some dogs can’t. You know your Greyhound, if they have an iron gut then go for it. If they have a more delicate digestion go slow or abstain. Never feed your dog toxic human items such as: chocolate, onions, garlic, grapes, raisins, yeast dough, artificial sweeteners, macadamia nuts, avocados, alcohol, or coffee.  Check with your veterinarian if you have questions. Be sure to cut their regular food back proportionately to avoid weight gain.


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